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Sustainable Tourism at USF

Study Sustainable Tourism at USF

The Patel College of Global Sustainability expands concentrations to include Sustainable Tourism


M.A. students in the Patel Collegel of Global Sustainability are able to pursue Sustainable Tourism as an area of study beginning in fall 2012. The new concentration offers students many unique opportunities and advantages including cutting edge courses, leadership and professional development opportunities and global internships with top firms in the tourism industry.

The concentration in Sustainable Tourism enables students to understand the relationship between tourism, society, culture and sustainability. Students will develop the skills necessary to design a successful sustainable tourism strategy and development plan that is beneficial to business, coastal and marine habitats, and the local community.

Program highlights setting us apart from others include:

Adoption of GSTC Criteria – our program has adopted the Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria (GSTC) that is fast becoming the global standard for sustainable tourism. This focus will prepare students for careers anywhere in the world using the new global standard.

Global Partnershipswe have established partnerships around the globe to provide unique experiences in sustainable tourism. They include but, are not limited to: Sustainable Travel International, Institute for Peace through Tourism, Global Vision International, Janus Hotels, Friends of the U.N., and The International Ecotourism Society.

Training Opportunities – through our partnership with Sustainable Travel International, students can be trained and certified as auditors to certify accommodations, shore excursions, resorts and destinations around the world. This will provide students with income possibilities and travel experiences while pursuing their degree. Our partnership with the Blue Community program can offer additional training programs for students.

Emphasis on Coastal Habitat & Ocean Protection – in cooperation with the International Ocean Institute Waves of Change campaign, we have developed an emphasis on coastal habitat and marine protection. This has included collaboration with companies such as Walt Disney World to identify key cost effective strategies to protect coastal habitat and marine environments. As the majority of tourist destinations around the world are located near coastal environments, our program is perfectly placed to lead industry standards.

Located in Prime Tourist Destination – our program is located in Florida where the tourism industry is central to the economy. USF is in close proximity to major tourist attractions including Walt Disney World, Sea World, Universal Studios, Busch Gardens, Florida Aquarium, miles of beaches, countless hotels and resorts, Cruise Lines, Shore Excursions and more. This environment provides unique opportunities for student field work and internships.


Top Notch Internships – we have strong ties to major firms and organizations where students can be placed including:


                                 



The M.A. Program in Global Sustainability also provides concentrations in Entrepreneurship and Water.

The deadline for applications is February 15, 2013.

Decisons of admission will be sent in March 2013.

Apply now for the M.A. in Global Sustainability!

 

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