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12 Strategies to Protect Coastal Habitat & Marine Environments

Blue Community Strategies For A Sustainable Planet & Healthy Ocean.

 

The Ocean is facing the possibility of mass extinction according to a high level International workshop recently convened at Oxford University.  Click Here for summary.

The key threats include: ocean acidification, climate change , ocean pollution, and overfishing at a rate that is 40% greater than the oceans can sustain.

Since most of the carbon emission as well as over 80% of ocean pollution is land based, there are several strategies that those concerned with sustainable tourism can implement to mitigate these concerns.

The twelve Blue Community strategies were developed in collaboration with Walt Disney World utilizing approaches that not only move tourism to sustainability, but are also proven to be cost effective.

The 12 Blue Communty Strategies: 

  1. Improve Building Design - Build more sustainably and for disaster reduction.

  2. Promote Mass Transportation - Reduce carbon emissions

  3. Reduce Energy Use

  4. Water Conservation

  5. Improve Waste Management

  6. Reduce Use of Plastic

  7. Promote Local Organic or Hydroponic Food 

  8. Promote Sustainable Seafood

  9. Protect Coastal Habitat & Cultural Heritage

  10. Clean Marina Initiative

  11. Education

  12. Planning, Policy, and Management 

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